Empowering Women and Girls in Tech

Bridging the Digital Gender Gap

Having tech experience on a resume can be key to forging a solid career path in the digital economy, but research shows that despite progress, less than 20 percent of bachelor’s degrees in computer science go to women, even though female graduates hold 60 percent of all bachelor’s degrees.

This translates into a significant disparity in the workforce, where women are underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and hold only 27 percent of all computer science jobs.

To help close the gender and skill gap in tech, Capital One partnered with AngelHack  to create Women in Tech Demo Days, bringing together hundreds of talented women and male allies—developers, designers and entrepreneurs—to compete in one-day hackathon events across the country and empower girls and women through technology.

“The hackathon community is reflective of the tech industry, with a male majority across the board, but at Women in Tech Demo Day, women were the majority. A significant number of women shared that this was their first hackathon, and now they have the increased confidence to be more active in similar events across the industry,” said Julie A. Elberfeld, Commercial Banking Divisional CIO and executive sponsor of Capital One Technology’s Diversity & Inclusion Initiative.

The hackathons also serve as networking and bonding opportunities for the participants, who are often the only women on their professional teams. “I met more female software engineers today than I have in my entire career,” said one attendee.

Using Tech Skills for the Greater Good

In addition to being fun, inspiring, and great for networking, the hackathons serve a greater good. They’re designed to connect participants with nonprofits in their communities, giving participants the opportunity to use their tech talent to develop a product or tool to help each nonprofit better serve their mission.

“Women in Tech Demo Day gives designers, developers, and entrepreneurs the opportunity to use their tech skills for social good in an inclusive and welcoming environment – something that participants said made the difference in their decision to sign up for the event,” said Elberfeld.

Women Helping Women

The challenge presented to the Demo Day participants aims to solve a problem they naturally feel strongly about: build a technical solution (mobile app, web app, etc.) that empowers girls and women in tech and supports nonprofits that are dedicated to helping them.

The winning team receives a scholarship to General Assembly, a leader in digital instruction, valued at $10,000 to put toward bootcamps or educational programming of their choice, and the local nonprofit partner is awarded a $15,000 grant in honor of the winning team.

To date Demo Days participants have worked with three nonprofits: Black Girls CODE in Washington, DC; Girls Who Code in New York City; and Girls, Inc in Dallas.

The hackathons result in innovative and inspiring tools like HerReality, the winning app in New York City hackathon. HerReality uses Google Cardboard-compatible 360-degree virtual reality videos to provide mentorship through personal content about what it is like to be a woman in tech, from being an intern to being a founder.

Learn more about nonprofits that support women and girls in tech: